Research

Module evaluation for emergency remote teaching: An oral hygiene case study during the COVID-19 pandemic

M Cupido, N Gordon, N Behardien

Abstract


Background. The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in emergency remote teaching, with limited student contact time. For programmes with strong clinical and community-based requirements, such as the Bachelor of Oral Health, one had to be innovative to meet module outcomes.

Objectives. To (i) evaluate the curriculum and pedagogy of two diverse modules in the second year; and (ii) explore contextual factors affecting teaching and learning.

Methods. This evaluation study used a mixed-methods design. The sample comprised lecturers (n=3), clinical teachers (n=2), students (n=29) and documents for analysis. The modified concept-indicator method and the emergency remote teaching environment frameworks guided the data collection process. Tools included questionnaires, a focus group discussion and document analysis. Quantitative data were presented as frequencies and qualitative data were themed.

Results. Student participation for the OHP213 module was 76% (n=19) and 68% for the LOS200 module (n=19). All the lecturers (n=3) participated. Overall, the content and teaching and learning specialists were satisfied with the modules, but made suggestions for improvement. Student experiences highlighted diversity in their learning styles and challenges, while lecturers articulated challenges and emphasised affordances during this period.

Conclusions. The curricula were generally found to be aligned in terms of outcomes, content and assessment. Emergency remote teaching presented affordances from the perspective of students and lecturers, which could be explored further. If online teaching were to be a feature of university education, the affordances highlighted by students and staff may argue for a revised hybrid approach to delivering an oral health programme. However, such a system would require thorough research, with the necessary support built into the university as an ecosystem.


Authors' affiliations

M Cupido, Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa

N Gordon, Department of Oral Hygiene, Faculty of Dentistry, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa

N Behardien, Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa

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Cite this article

African Journal of Health Professions Education 2022;14(1):17.

Article History

Date submitted: 2022-03-18
Date published: 2022-03-18

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