Research

Practice guidelines for peer support among educators during a curriculum innovation

M Shawa, Y Botma

Abstract


Background. Curriculum transformation in nursing education addresses changing healthcare needs of communities. However, without ongoing support of educators, the fidelity of curriculum enactment could be compromised. Nursing education institutions in Lesotho implemented a competency-based curriculum that required novel pedagogical approaches. New facilitation approaches can challenge implementers, as was observed during the implementation of a new curriculum for the midwifery programme in Lesotho. Without ongoing faculty development and support, the educators resorted to supporting one another. However, the sustainability and effectiveness of the unstructured peer support could be compromised; hence the need to develop guidelines to enhance peer support among educators during curriculum innovation.

Objective. To develop and validate guidelines to enhance peer support among educators during curriculum innovation.

Methods. A qualitative research design with multiple data collection methods was conducted, guided by the World Health Organization Handbook for Guideline Development as the framework. Three interrelated phases, inclusive of an integrative review, an exploratory qualitative study, guideline development and validation, were conducted. External reviewers validated the developed guidelines by means of a Delphi survey.

Results. Five priority areas were identified for the practice guidelines, i.e. attributes of peer supporters, peer support strategies, content/support needs, outcomes of peer support, and monitoring and evaluation of the peer support strategy. Recommendations were formulated for each priority area.

Conclusion. These practice guidelines provide relevant recommendations that can enhance peer support among educators in nursing education programmes during curriculum innovation. The recommendations serve as a blueprint and provide direction for the structured peer support engagements.


Authors' affiliations

M Shawa, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

Y Botma, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

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Cite this article

African Journal of Health Professions Education 2020;12(4):186-190. DOI:10.7196/AJHPE.2020.v12i4.1388

Article History

Date submitted: 2020-12-01
Date published: 2020-12-01

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