Research

The lived experience of health sciences students’ participation in an interprofessional community-based stroke class

M Kloppers, F Bardien, A Titus, J Bester, G Inglis-Jassiem

Abstract


Background. Collaborative approaches in healthcare contexts may provide better care for patients. Interprofessional circuit-based group therapy could counter profession-specific tribalism. There is no evidence on interprofessional education (IPE) community-based interventions on student learning in the health professions.

Objective. To explore undergraduate health sciences students’ experience of being involved in community-based interprofessional circuit-based group therapy.

Methods. Semi-structured interviews were inductively analysed exploring undergraduate health sciences students’ experience of involvement in an IPE community-based stroke intervention.

Results. A total of 12 final-year students participated, with representation from physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. This IPE opportunity beneficially impacted students’ collaborative competencies in knowledge, attitudes, skills and behaviours. This community-based rotation immersed students in a service-delivery environment where patient management was co-ordinated by a multiprofessional rehabilitation team. The integrated stroke circuit group activity aimed to enhance further interconnectedness between student participants. Students who were exposed to this clinical activity reported an understanding of (i) patients’ unique contexts; (ii) role development and complementary overlap between health professions; and (iii) the value of joint interventions to both patients and rehabilitation teams in resource-constrained settings.

Conclusion. These students have been primed in their practice-readiness as healthcare professionals for the 21st century who will promote quality care, and embrace collaborative professional practice and person-centredness.


Authors' affiliations

M Kloppers, Division of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa

F Bardien, Division of Speech, Language and Hearing Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa

A Titus, Division of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa

J Bester, Division of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa

G Inglis-Jassiem, Division of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa

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Cite this article

African Journal of Health Professions Education 2022;14(2):.

Article History

Date submitted: 2022-02-07
Date published: 2022-02-07

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